2017 SOLAR ECLIPSE IN TACOMA

On August 21, a total solar eclipse will cast its shadow across the country for a spectacular show unseen in nearly 40 years. Whether you are heading south toward the path of totality in Oregon, or intend to view the eclipse from within Pierce County, Tacoma is a fantastic gateway to experience this celestial event.

Where to see the solar eclipse in Tacoma

The view: Eclipse with Mt. Rainier and the Murray Morgan Bridge Learn More...
The view: Eclipse with a sun-dial sculpture and Mt. Rainier in the background. Learn More...
The view: Unobstructed views from the open water at Owen Beach Learn More...

Eclipse events in South Puget Sound

The view: Eclipse with the backdrop of Mt. Rainier from the top of Crystal Mountain Learn More...
Skip the crowds rushing to Oregon and watch this once-in-a-lifetime astronomical event from our central plaza. Free Learn More...
"Get Mooned in Lakewood" with themed music, "Dark Side Dawgs," Moon Pies and special eye glasses to view the eclipse without Learn More...
We are just outside the path of the total eclipse, but from Lakewood, 94% of the sun will be blocked by the moon! The Learn More...

How to see the solar eclipse (safely)

Do not look directly at the sun, even when it's obscured and dimmer than usual. The doctors really can't stress this enough

Special glasses made specifically for the eclipse are relatively inexpensive (especially when compared to long-term, eye-related medical care) and available - often in bulk - on Amazon.com

Boy watching solar eclipse

When to see the solar eclipse in Tacoma

Start looking safely (see below) skyward at 9:08 a.m. Pacific Time. There'll be a partially obscured giant ball of ignited gas in the south-eastern sky. Can't miss it. Here's what you'll see:

Eclipse beginning from Tacoma

At about 10:20 a.m., the eclipse will reach its maximum, which in Tacoma and most of Pierce County will be a partial eclipse of about 94% of the total. It'll look something like this:
Height of the solar eclipse
 
By 11:38 a.m., it'll be over:
Height of the solar eclipse